Feb. 23, 2021

Episode 21 - From Broken To Real Estate Mogul with Terrica Lynn Smith


Episode 21 of Nicky and Moose the Podcast is one you don’t want to miss. For this episode, the duo brought in a real estate mogul who is taking over in more ways than one —Mrs. Terrica Lynn Smith.

Terrica is the owner of multi-million dollar real estate developments, creator of the Developers board game, speaker, and more! She’s been featured in numerous articles and has even been to the White House.  

But how did she go from being a homeless mom to the real estate tycoon we see today? Check out today’s episode to find out her story and what you can take away to help build your brand or business.

What you will discover: 

  • How to keep persist through challenges.
  • The importance of finding your niche.
  • Things you need to enjoy success.
  • How your past hardships can position you for success.
  • The significance of not hesitating to move on your dream.
  • The benefits of social media in impacting lives.
  • Alignment comes as you continue to move forward. 
  • The benefits of being an interrupter…being odd
  • The moment you begin to win.
  • Be patient.
Transcript

Nicky Saunders:

What's poppin'? What's poppin'? What's poppin'? Welcome to Nicky and Moose! I'm Nicky! That's Moose! 'Sup Moose?

Mostafa Ghonim:

What up y'all?

Nicky Saunders:

And listen, we have a mogul. We have a real estate like goddess. I'm spicing her up. I'm spicing her up. Who else in the real estate game has a board game? I don't know anybody. I don't know, another real estate developer that has a board game that, you know, maybe...I'm not going to get into her pockets. She'll get into her own pockets. I'm not even going to talk about it. Before I introduce right with the name, so you know who we talking about, (Hint: We talked about her a little bit before, in episodes before), but Moose, how do you feel about this individual?

Mostafa Ghonim:

Yeah, one of the most humble beings man. I mean, honestly, if you're in a room with this person, you wouldn't really know unless somebody puts you on game. But she's about her business. Like, you know, she she really can roll her sleeves and get to work. So I'm excited to introduce her to the platform and have her teach some gems.

Nicky Saunders:

We are talking about Terrica Lynn Smith. But, let's get into this intro.

Jaymie Jordan:

Two kids from Queens, cut from a different cloth. Now joining forces helping you to elevate your personal brand. Yeah I'm talking about Nicky and Moose! Bringing you a never before seen perspective into the mindset, the mentality, the behaviors, the driving force, but more importantly, the stories behind the people and brands that you know and love the most.

Nicky Saunders:

And you already know what time it is, it is the review of the week! And this one was done by Zed. What's up Zed? Hi Zed! I love Zed! This podcast... exemplifies the true core meaning of selflessness value with an innovative and creative approach. Nicky and Moose are giving countless gems for all brands to create a playbook to be successful. Ya mean? I'm trying! Yeah, I see what you did Zed. I see what you did Zed. Look, shout out to everybody who leaves us a review. Make sure you do that. And every week, we are going to highlight at least one person. Today was Zed. But let's get into our guest. I'm super excited about this one. I'm super, hold on, hold on. What's up Terrica? She smiles she smiles.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Hey Nicky! Hey Moose!

Mostafa Ghonim:

What's up?

Nicky Saunders:

So so look real quick, real quick. let the people know who you are all that great stuff. And then we just gonna have a casual conversation so we can get everything out of your brain and have a board game and have as much money as you do, you know? Trying to do what you do. I'm just saying. But anyways, introduce yourself to Terrica.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Hey, so my name is Terrica Lynn Smith. I'm a real estate developer extremely passionate about preventing gentrification in the inner cities. And our mission is to build affordable homes in these communities that have not received investment dollars in decades, along while changing the hearts and minds of the individuals within the community to have ownership and keep to subsidize.

Nicky Saunders:

Y'all hear that elevator pitch. Ya mean? Y'all hear that! Y'all hear that! Moose, start it off.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Yeah, yeah. Terrica, let us know where the journey started. I mean, you know, it's rare that first off you find a minority female in the development space. Now, of course, real estate agents, and I'm not downplaying real estate agents. But yeah, but, you know, introduce yourself from you know, where that journey began. Did you start as an agent? You know? Just catch us up with that.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Right. So, just to, just to back up a little bit past that, like I had zero experience when I got into real estate. I just knew that I wanted a career I wanted to, I wanted to change my life. I was very, very poor. Didn't have no money a few years before that I was homeless with my son. And so for me, I just wanted something that I can leave to my children and so I went to real estate school. And of course, if you're not around people that talk certain types of language, you have no clue what you're getting yourself into. And so I failed the real estate exam seven times, you know? Over and over again. Yeah. So it was like it was rough starting off, but I knew that I wanted, I wanted it bad enough, I had nothing else to lose. And so I just kept on pushing. And eventually, I passed the real estate exam, I got into real estate started off as a real estate agent, I found my niche with real estate investors, I started building real estate portfolios. And then after I started building real estate portfolios, I realized that this is something I wanted to do for myself, because no one was gonna ever allow me the chance and opportunity to go and do this. You know, on my own, like, they wanted it for themselves. So I had to break free. And, you know, that's how I eventually became a real estate developer, because my heart is, you know, to be able to change the trajectory of the inner cities and communities that don't receive investment dollars in the only way to do that is to pioneer it yourself.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Wow, that's really cool.

Nicky Saunders:

Okay, hold on. You said you failed seven times?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Seven times. Yes.

Nicky Saunders:

Okay, so so, so talk about, talk about maybe the fifth time. Like talk about how, like, what made you like, I get it, you wanted to continue, like you wanted that bag. That bag. Why I say bag? I'm instantly thinking money with you. I don't even know why right? But we already know that you want it bad. But clearly after the second, the fourth time, that can be extremely discouraging. And I know like our audience has probably failed one or two times, but you're saying it took you seven. So kind of just talk us like the process and your mind. Like, how did you get to that seven? Like, if you had to do 20 more would you have done it? Like just talk that out for us.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Right. So what I'll say is this during the time I was taking my real estate exam, I was extremely poor. Like I could not afford to pay the $100 every single time to go take the test. I just didn't have the money. And so there was points where I had to make a decision, do I pay my light bill or do I go and take the real estate exam? My life at that point in time, you know, by the time I had two children, we survived Hurricane Katrina and I had nothing else to lose. Like I was desperate for change. Like I wanted something to change in my life. And I knew that if I didn't keep moving forward, then the reality that I was actually living in while I was struggling to pay my bills, and I didn't have a lot of food, and I didn't have no money, or I didn't have any resources, I would remain there. And so I knew that at least passing this exam, having that real estate license gave me a little hope that I could be able to sell a lot of homes and then start generating income so I can change my life. But you know, I you know, people say desperate times calls for desperate measures, I believe that to the core because for me, I was desperate in the situation that I was in, like I hated being poor. It took me a while to hate being poor. Like, you know what I'm saying? People don't really tell the truth, but I hated being poor. You know, I hated asking people for money. I hated going to the bank and asking them to reverse my NSF fees. I hated not knowing if I had money to go to the grocery store, or if I even had enough on my card. You know, so those were times that I actually hate it. And I hated it enough that I wanted it to change. And it made me become desperate about doing something that I would be able to change the trajectory of my life and for my children as well. Because your children struggle when you struggle, right. So if I'm struggling, My children are part of that struggle. And, and that struggle is not pretty, it's very ugly, it makes you a very anxious person and makes you desperate. And so for me, I always was like, I want to be the mother who have a relationship with their kids and not just so focused on living paycheck to paycheck and not having nothing to be able to get to them. And so I was desperate for it. And that's what kept me going and honestly, you know, finding the money, you know, that was the hardest part, you know? Figuring out ways to pull that money together to be able to go take that exam. So I just knew that I had to keep on doing it and it's easy to give up. But I just knew if I gave up I would still be in that one bedroom apartment with my kids and and still in the same struggle. So it had to have something different...when you at rock bottom, the only way the only way to look is up right? So for me I'm like look that license is me looking up.

Nicky Saunders:

This is facts. Moose, Moose, would you would you try 7 times? Would you try?

Mostafa Ghonim:

Geez, man, that takes a lot of courage. I'm not gonna lie to you Terrica. You know, I think the only other example that I can remember from the show is Pharrell.

Nicky Saunders:

Mm hmm.

Mostafa Ghonim:

It reminds me of Pharrell when he made that song for the movie Despicable Me Happy. He didn't get it until his 10th try. So I don't think...and of course, you know, we know it's a part of the game. But it's one of those things that it's a lot easier said than done. But you know, props to you for, you know, continuing to show up, especially at a time where, like you said, financially, it wasn't like you were just okay, let me go try again. It was it was a difficult time.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yeah.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Let me let me ask you this, though. Terrica. What, what came next? I know, you kind of said it really quickly, like you went for real estate into working with investors. But you said a few key things there, you found your niche. And that was working with investors. And then you went on to doing it for yourself. And then now in the development space,. Talk about that, for you know, the importance of finding your niche, especially from a professional services standpoint. We talk a lot about it from a personal branding standpoint. But for other for other people in the professional services, it seemed like you having that niche still was one of the things that really helped you get to where you are today. Explain that to us a little bit more.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

So when I first got started in real estate, I passed the exam. I'm like, Yes, I'm about to be rich. I'm about to make all kinds of money, right? Then the first year, I did like a whopping $5,000. I'm like, man, I could have just went to McDonald's, I gotta do some different, right? Like $5,000? I mean, I took the exam seven times, cost me $700 just to take the test, and I made $5,000. You know, along with all the other expenses, it cost me to be a realtor, I really broke even. And so I was like, Okay, I don't have like no, no name behind me, like, in our communities, you have Boudreaux's and Thibodeau's and Smith's like these are big families that are heavily involved in real estate and they downline don't have to work twice as hard as an individuals who don't have that. And then you have the remaining of the realtors who's all focused on the exact same thing, right? Finding sellers and finding buyers and, and buying properties and selling properties for these for these consumers. And so for me, I was like, I have to find something that's going to separate me. The only reason why I knew I needed to do that was because I was tired of fighting 1,500 realtors for the same house and asking the seller to be able to sell their property. They're like, How many times are realtors gonna call me? I was like, yo, she right! Like, I'm tired of calling them myself you know? Like every time you call...somebody to call, right? And so for me, I was like, What can I do different? And so I started looking around the marketplace, I realized that, you know, there wasn't no real investor specialists. And so I was like, Okay, so now I need to learn about investments in real estate. So I started self educating myself. That's huge, right? I self educated myself, in real estate investing, to the point where I got, I got enough courage to start going looking for investors. And I literally went door to door, you know, gas station to gas station. And the only reason why I found my first investor was because I was taking a gasoline break at a gas station, and I went into the store to get a few items. And a customer was upset and she was like, let me speak to the owner. Now, mind you, this was not this was like unplanned, okay? And then so she comes and the owner come out, and she's like, Are you the owner? He was like, yes, I'm the owner of the store. And I was like, oh, okay, that's alright. That's how I can get investors. They in these corner stores. So I went and I approached them, I introduced myself, I told them who I was. And I asked him to let me work for him for free. Let me find you some buildings and real estate for free. But not just that, if you have anything you want to sell, I'm not going to charge you on your first deal. I won't charge you anything. You just got to pay my company. Yeah. And he was like, nobody never told me that before. But I didn't have a whole lot of lineage behind me. So I needed to do something to separate myself from the rest. And to this day, that investor is still my investor and he owns a chain of grocery stores and clothing stores.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Wow. Wow. That's dope!

Nicky Saunders:

All right. All right. Okay, so, so Terrica. You know, I'm gonna kind of ask about this. So, there was this program, right? There was this program that you happen to sign up for right called Game Changers, right? Shout out to E, right? From a real estate developer to a speaker's program, right? Break that down. Why? Because I personally wanted to know this, like, why did you join the program? Because what I will say that program has helped you, like developed into the public figure that you are right now. Right. Not saying that it helped you in the real estate kind of thing. But who we know you for right now publicly. It has helped you. But what made you sign up to that? Because the the breakdown that I think me and Moose saw during it, I was like, why, why? Why would you? Why Why? Like, I wouldn't, I wouldn't get on stage and cry like that, like, so break down why you started the program, right? And shout out to E and all the game changers out there. But yeah, I always wanted to know, like, but why?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yeah, that's a great question. So I'll tell you this, um, I was running and running and running til I became exhausted. I was running for success constantly. I never looked back behind me, like I just kept on moving forward. And to be honest, I had a lot of issues that I've never dealt with a lot of pain and hurt from my mother, you know, from abandonment, and just being in foster care, and feeling inadequate, and ugly and unworthy. Right, I had all of these real feelings that I kept inside. But the problem was when I was running, I didn't know I had all that yuck going on, because I was so distracted. But it gets to a point, like, I'm very successful and blessed in my career right now. That even at that point, when I signed up for Game Changers, I was extremely successful, but I was ready to commit suicide. And so for me, I couldn't understand why I'm feeling like this, but also why they keep inviting me into these big old rooms, like, why am I being contacted by like, huge investors, like, huge, right, and I can't share but it's confidential. But like, rooms, I shouldn't even be in, corporations who shouldn't even know about me. And I started becoming, um, I started feeling unworthy. And I felt like, I was uncalled to be this person. And I felt like I was being fake. And I also felt like, I didn't have enough words to communicate with these people on this level. So I was like, if I joined a speaking program, then I can speak confident, I can be bold, I can be courageous, when I walk into the room, I'm gonna have authority. And that was my whole reason for joining Game Changers. And so we went um, E had an event in New York. And he he said this one thing that changed my life and made me sign up for the program, he said, a lot of you have reached so much success, that you don't even realize what you have, because you haven't even dealt with the pain that you had as a little kid. And you got a video of me Nicky on the front row crying. Snot, boogers, and tears...he's talking to me you know? And, and, and I said, I need to join this program, like I need to be around this energy, I need to be around these people who, who are moving mountains out of people life. And so I joined Game Changers. And I didn't realize how bad it was until I got on the stage. And I literally broke down like I couldn't even get 10 words. And I remember CJ looking at me and he like, I just need you to wrap. And then I just you know, I was like, Alright, I'm gonna get better at this. I'm gonna get through this. And Valarie, Coach, Val had a call that's a part of the program, right? She had a call and on that call, she kept on asking me, why are you in this program? Why are you in this program? I'm like ugh! She agravating! Like, why she keep asking me all this? Like she really like digging in my business, right? And so finally I told her, I said, I don't know why I'm in this program. I just need to quit. I just need to get out of here. And she said, Wait, hold on. And then from that call, we started talking further. And then it became real to me that I was unsure of the person who I was. And I've been hurt so much in my life, that the light that was shining on me. I was I was afraid of it and I was running from it. I didn't want the light on me. And so I would hide in the back rooms and I would sit in the back chairs and I would always be the person who's really very, very quiet. And, and, and try to stay away. And so being a part of Game Changers helped me realize that I'm exactly where I'm supposed to be and helped me deal with a lot of other stuff as well.

Nicky Saunders:

Shoutout to Game Changers for real. For those people who don't know what that is real quick, this is the speaker's program that is led by E and CJ and the whole ETA squad. So if people are like, I don't know what Game Changers is. What is that? It's a speakers' program. Don't worry about it. But anyways, Moose what's up?

Mostafa Ghonim:

Yeah, yeah, that's good. That's good Terrica. And and man, thanks for doing the work on you. You know, I'm saying because I think the there's so many people have been who have been blessed by what you've been able to share. And just kind of like your story, I'm kind of like sitting back and just listening. You know, we joked about this before we got on. But it was about a year ago, where we were in the room at the Game Changers program. Ironically, we had a training with Extreme Execution, and you all were there as well at the church. And we were doing kind of like a small breakout session, and we started talking about yo utilize your eyebrows to kind of connect with people from a facial expression, especially if you tend to have that kind of resting blank stare, you know, and I joke because I came on and Terrica had the eyebrows really working. I'm like, Okay, I see you. That's what's up. Yeah, that's good. That's good. That's good. I love it. Now, now you you've expanded, you know, and I love the story. Like I love to kind of see the trajectory that people go on when they are developing personally developing professionally, but you let us know about the troubles that you had early on. I love how you were able to find your niche. Now you're in a relatively unique space that's not really walked on, or walked in by females, let alone black or minority females that that I think is is you know, more power to you for just being bold to walk in that. Tell us a little bit about, you know, some of the things that you found to be very helpful on that journey. So when you're entering a space, that there aren't people who look like you in there, or there aren't many... whatever the case may be, right, those labels that tend to kind of box people out, what do you think are some of the things that helps you finally find yourself in some of those rooms?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yes, no, that's a great question. I realize that everybody got yuck, right? Going through this process, like there's no perfect person in the world, like, there's a lot of pretenders who pretend to be perfect. But if you're just yourself, like, if you just been 100, then you have nothing to hide, you know, can nobody come attack you and, and humiliate you, and, you know, say all this other stuff for me, you know, I never shared my story about the sexual abuse, being in foster care, being a teenage mom and being homeless. And so I've always had that over my shoulder. And when I let that go, I experienced true freedom. Because I didn't, I didn't have anything else to hide, everybody knew all of me, like I just opened up all of my yuck to the world, you know? And so now when I'm going into these boardrooms, and when I'm meeting with these executives and CEOs, you know, I'm very confident in my capabilities of what I can do, because I have, you know, I have reports, right? I have receipts, and they can pull them and see them. And another great thing is that a lot of the times they reach out to me, I don't have to interview for anything. And so going in there, and knowing that already sets the precedent, you know, it is extremely hard as an African American woman developer, especially being the only one in the state of Louisiana, okay. The reason why is because developers, although it's never said are supposed to look a certain way and act a certain way. I was even told like Why do you want to be a real estate developer just, you know, just build or do whatever the case may be, right. But I'm a chain breaker, you know, and I think being street strong, and going through all the hell that I went through as a child growing up, it allowed me to deal with the type of people I have to deal with in today's world where they look down on you, and they talk to you a certain way. And they treat you a certain way. The beauty of having your own is you don't have to tolerate any of that. And they have to come and talk to you. You know, and so, being the woman to say, I want this type of house, and I want this type of grocery store, and I want this type of apartment complex, they can't tell me anything, because it's mine, you know, and as a developer, you get to design all of that you get to choose that you're not asking for permission anymore. And so I think you have to be extremely strong, and you got to be steadfast. You gotta stand 10 toes deep, even when they try to punch you and knock you down, you know, it is a man's world in real estate development, you know, but there is room for everybody to be a part of it, to be honest with you. It's just, it's a lot of women don't believe that they're capable of doing it. But I believe that we can do whatever we put our minds to. I mean, I failed the exam seven times, and I'm developing multimillion dollar communities. So it's possible.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Light flex! Nicks let me double back if you don't mind.

Nicky Saunders:

Go ahead.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Terrica, in 30 seconds, a minute, whatever it is, what's the difference between real estate investment and real estate development? Like, give us the ABCs of that real quick?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Right, so it's still investments, real estate investment whether you're a developer, a builder, rehabber a landlord, you're still an investor. It's just a different type of investing, right? As a real estate developer, you develop the streets, you develop the buildings, you develop the lots, the meets, the bounds, everything within that community. So you live in a neighborhood, a developer had to visualize that and bring it to life. Real Estate Investments is pretty much like the octopus, whatever leg you want to grab, whether it's multifamily, whether it's new construction, whether it's rehabbing whether it's crowdfunding, whatever the platform is you choose to use in real estate investing. It's really up to you. But for me, I've been through I've grabbed quite a few legs, but my main leg is real estate development.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Nice.

Nicky Saunders:

I can go? I can go Moose? I can go?

Mostafa Ghonim:

Yeah, I just wanted to kind of like quick for some people who were wondering like, yo, what is what is that? So yeah, yeah.

Nicky Saunders:

Facts. Okay. So break something down for me. Because Mal, shout out to Jamal King. We got to get him on the podcast. Mal and you didn't believe in social media. Like you didn't like putting yourself out there. Like, I don't get it. Is it a real estate thing? Like y'all don't really rock with social like, Is it like a certain pay grade? Like when I make this I don't I don't do social media? What is it? Like what made you change? If you want to mention my name, that's fine. But what made you change because now your name is getting out there a whole lot more. The the board game which we're gonna get into is selling a lot more. I'm just saying like, what what was it with social media? How did you feel about it? What made you change all that great stuff?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yeah, I hated people knowing my business. Like, I'm like, you know I'm kind of the one that be like... Yeah, I'm like, why? Like, I'm kind of like the one that ask the question when you peeking out the blinds. Like why being nosy, right? So like, for me, social media was like that, like, why y'all so nosey? Like, I'm not telling y'all my business. And what I realized was that my story inspired a lot of people. And so social media has been a platform to be able to spread the word a whole lot faster. Because if I'm being truthful, I only care about how many lives I'm gonna impact before I leave, right? The dollars are great, don't get me wrong, because I know what it's like to not have none. So trust me, they're great. But, you know, for me, the reward is, how many people can I help come from where they're at currently, and are, you know, in the past, like, you know, like, a lot of people have past issues that they haven't dealt with, like I was dealing with at the time. So, you know, I'm big on impacting people. And so I don't think it's a real estate thing. But real estate is a different type of grind, you don't really have time to be scrolling, you know, you scroll too much, you may mess around and, and get a judgment or a lien on your property, but not paying attention. You know, so for us, you know, you gotta you gotta be you gotta be in there, like real estate is not just cute, you got to be in the mud, like, you got to be up in there. And so I think that that's probably what me and Mal share is that, you know, we understand the importance of making sure that the business is running successfully, and that we don't have no hiccups on the back end, because it can be very costly. And so that didn't allow a whole lot of time on social media. You know, I'm forcing the time now, because it's important to me to make sure that if there's a child in foster care, they can look at somebody like them, such as myself, and dream. You know, it is very hard to dream when you're surviving. And so I like to make sure that my story allows them to dream while they're surviving.

Nicky Saunders:

All right, that's cool. That's cool.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Gotta cover the bases. Yep, I'm with it Nicks, gotta cover the bases with social media boy. I'm with it.

Nicky Saunders:

She was not on it. I promise you. She was like, I do not want to be on this. I don't want to do it. Nicky, you do it. I'm not doing it.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Shout out to Nicky. I mean man. She was like, What is it that you do? Anothe Val. I'm like, I sell real esta e. She like no, no, no, break it down. I'm like, Nicky, come on. Then I was like, ahh. The she got on our call and I was ike I got it Nicky! I know I now!

Nicky Saunders:

And the funny thing Moose, let me tell you this, the funny thing is like, I'm one of those people that will like ask, and then if you get too frustrated, I'll back off. Like alright cool. You don't want to talk? I'm cool with it. You figure it out. I'm not gonna figure out your social media. That's not what we're doing. So then one day, she was just like, Nicky, I got it. Actually, I think she was on the call or whatever. She was just like, Yo, this is happening. This is happening. And it's all cuz of Nicky, I get it Nicky, you did this. And I was like, when did I say this to you? And it was just like one of the calls that I was in like she was listening. And she's like, I get it. I get it. Now, I'm breaking it down the importance of my brand. I get it. I'm like, I said this to you over a year ago. What are you talking about? But shout out to her because she is she's killing it. Go head Moose! My bad!

Mostafa Ghonim:

Yeah. Take us take us on that next path. Now. You know, we mentioned it a few times. We talked about the board game. Right? What what what feels to me is like the modern day Monopoly, you know? Like Monopoly been around for ages. We all grew up on it. There's a new Monopoly in town. Talk to us about about the board game Terrica. How did this thing get...How did you come up with the idea? What is it? Like give us, Yeah, give us the backstory on that.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yeah, that's awesome. So Developers board game was created because I wanted to be able to help more people at a younger age get started early, because a lot of people start investing in real estate late, right? Then it be like, I don't even know what's going on, you know? And so I was like, Yo, what if we can find a way where we can help people early, like so many people is reaching out, like, Can you show me how to develop, show me this and that and I'm like, Lord, what can I do to help? So I went to sleep, and I had a dream. And I was standing at the top of a mountain, okay. And at the top of the mountain, they had a ton of people that was around me, but what's crazy is if you know me, I'm big... I used to have this course called How to Play Monopoly in Real Life. So I love Monopoly. Like, it's hard to beat me in Monopoly. I'm just letting y'all know, it's very hard. Alright? But I remember, in this dream, it was going around a board, and I was like, Oh, so I woke up and I was like, I'm going to create a board game. So I called my brother and I'm like, Yo, I want to create a board game. He was like Oh, okay. You just started this? I'm like nah, maybe? Yeah, I dreamed it, you know, but I want to do this, like, I really want to do this, I want to get it out this year. We had like four months left in the year, last year, right? And so I called my other two business partners I'm like hey, I want to create a board game. So I wrote in my notebook, what I wanted this board game to consist of, and what I wanted it to teach individuals, so they can get started. And so after drew it on paper, went through quite a few designers, Nicky know, right? Got a good designer on the team, and he was able to create the design for me. Now, mind you, we contacted manufacturers, they like look, you ain't gonna be able to get this out for 18 months. And so my partners and them was like, aww, man, we just, you know, let's just push it next year. I'm like nah. It gotta be this I want it this year. And so we was able to get the game out and to everybody within four months. So from drawing design, all the way to production, you know, coming from China on a boat, you know, was able to get the game out and it's changing lives. I mean, we have testimony after testimony after testimony on how children children are telling their parents what bankruptcy is and what leverage is and assets and liabilities and so it's just an awesome, awesome experience to be able to share that with your children. And in the meantime, you're also increasing their financial their financial IQ on real estate like they don't like that's not something that's normally taught so now you're teaching them that which to me is everything.

Nicky Saunders:

I'm just saying I got the board game ya mean? Actually I got a, I'm gonna go back to the board game, but I want to I want to talk about this because you, you made your name known in real estate and now you're building your personal brand. You have your board game, you have webinars now and everything like that. From a person who said, Yo, I don't want to put my business out there to now building a solid personal brand, like, how do you decide what goes out to the world? And what doesn't in your terms, right? Not just in general, but in like your terms because you have an amazing story. Right? from like, beginning to now and future like you have an amazing story. But how did you determine this is what I'm going to talk about. This is what I'm not going to talk about, because you even show your kids getting like 19 different houses and deals while some of us struggle not even getting one. Like, this is crazy, but um, yeah, talk to the people how you how you even determine what goes out on social media.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

So for me is very simple, right? Like, I'm not gonna share my meals, you know? I don't think nobody care about what I'm eating or anything like that. Not at all.

Nicky Saunders:

Don't you have like dope deserts where you live at?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yeah. That don't matter. I'm not I'm not a food specialist. I'm eating to eat so for me, it ain't about... you know, I'm not gonna tell you nothing about nobody food. But what I will say is that I, the stuff that I do put out on the internet is stuff that's helpful, right? So self help stuff, like people can just actually see and be like, yo, she did that like that, like a lot of times they like, Yo her 15 year old daughter just bought a property. They be like, how's that even possible? She not even 18. Right. And so I walk them through the process and and let them see like, yeah, you can start this now for your children. They don't have to be 18. Right? You're their legal guardian. And you can you can get it going. And so for me, things like that, where I know that people are like, looking for that type of information. I just like to share it. I just like to give it away, and let them know that they too can do it. So if I feel like it's something that people are like, How can I do that? Especially when it'd be like especially when it's in my my lane? Right real estate? I'm going to share it. But if it ain't my lane. I'm not really talking about it. You don't see me talk about much that's not in my lane other than football. You know the Saints. You know I talk about that. That's my lane.

Nicky Saunders:

Alright. I can't say nothing. Giants ain't anything anyways. Ya mean? Giants ain't doing anything.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Unfortunately.

Nicky Saunders:

Yeah. Whoo! Go ahead Moose. My bad.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Yeah, I'm curious. You know, I think it's always an opportunity to extract some some leadership lessons, you know, from from someone who has had to deal with a lot of people, you know, like, in the industry that you're in, I'm sure whether it be on the buyer side, the seller side, you've mentioned you have your own team, you've mentioned having to maybe deal with communication barriers, if you're getting products over from China. I'm familiar with that a little bit as well. What would you say is just maybe like one or two, you know, leadership tips that you would give to somebody out there who's like, Man, you know, what, I kinda got some things in common with, with Terrica. And, and but it's just not clicking for me the same way, what are some lessons that you can share back with the people?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Keep doing it, even if you don't know it. Like, just keep doing it, like, keep on moving forward. Like, a lot of us stop, because we can't figure out like how it looks or what's going to happen, or what's next, or whatever the case may be. But for me, I knew nothing about a board game creation, I knew nothing about communication with China, I knew nothing about the freight, and the shipping costs, and the customs and all of the stuff that we had to go through the insurance and all of that stuff. But if you keep on like, for me, if you keep on moving forward, things start aligning themselves, and you start putting it together, you know, so if I wouldn't listen to everybody who told me we couldn't have the patent and trademark and have our game copyrighted and all that, in the time that we did, I would have never ever ever got to this point. So I just kept pushing forward, and I kept pushing the people that was around me to move forward as well. So keep moving, even if you don't know what it looks like, even if you feel like man, you may mess up or do it wrong. You just got to keep you got to keep on pushing, you know. And the other thing I would say is be that interrupter. Like so many people don't do that. Right. Like you have to interrupt something to get attention. For me, I interrupted the real estate industry because I'm an African American real estate developer, right? So people are Yo, where she come from? Who she is? How she know this you know? So don't be afraid to be odd. In order to be number one, you have to be odd. So for me, I always hold on to that concept and I keep moving like that. Don't be afraid to be odd.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Love it. Love it.

Nicky Saunders:

Alright...so you happen to have gone to the White House that like you do some big things that I'm I'm surprised we didn't really hit in the beginning. But my question is, when did, from a person who's just like, I don't want to put business out there, I'm just going work. When did the winning streak start for you? Because I remember going on Facebook, you were in this article, this article going here going there. I'm like, yo, you don't even. Then all of a sudden, I see all these amazing photo shoots and everything. I'm like ok! Ok! She's coming out here! I see you! So when did the winning streak start? And what was the most memorable article or visit or accomplishments so far in these past like, two, three years or something like that?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Wow. Umm...

Nicky Saunders:

Yep, loaded. Hello. Hello.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

That's loaded. Yeah

Nicky Saunders:

I know. I know.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

I would say that for me, when I became unapologetic about Terrica Lynn Smith, is when I started winning. Like that's the truth.

Nicky Saunders:

Say that! Say that again.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yeah, I just became unapologetic about me. You know, I stopped asking permission. And I just started taking it. I would say, for me, my most memorable moment is having my son name approved for the street sign. That right there means everything to me, because I have worked like a Hebrew day and night, weekends, vacations, you know?

Nicky Saunders:

Shout out to the Hebrews.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Yo, you're a clown! This girl! Go for it Terrica.

Nicky Saunders:

Go ahead. My bad. My bad.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Only Nicky, only Nicky. But I'll set my most memorable moment. Like I said, it was being able to have my son name on the street sign. That right there is everything. Because, you know, you work so hard. And sometimes, you like, Man, what do I have to show for it? But that's gonna be here until the end of the world. So for me, that's everything.

Nicky Saunders:

Oh, hold on. Hold on. Moose let me ask. How did that even happen? How did that even happen? Don't give all the details. But like, give some simple steps that maybe somebody could like research that now like, Okay, hold on, because I want I want my kid to have a street name, like give them give him at least one or two steps to start researching.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

You have to be a real estate developer. Developers name the streets, developers choose the life sciences, how big your yards are going to be developers to the roads and how big they're going to be the beautification in the communities, you just have to be a real estate developer. That's why I loved having this seat. Because not just that my children would eat off this community when I'm long and gone because we have associations, right? If you live in a community with a HOA association, that goes to the developer, you know? So it's just things like that, you know, when you're sitting at the right seat it's important, you know, because you get opportunities that otherwise wouldn't be granted. So being a rehabber, if you can't name a street, you know, having multifamily buildings, you can name the building, but you can name the street, you know, so for me, you know, that was huge.

Nicky Saunders:

I pay I pay a developer. Go ahead Moose.

Mostafa Ghonim:

I love it. Yeah, this will be my last question Terrica. But you know one of our our favorite things to talk about, you know, on the podcast is obviously the flight assessment. You know, I think it's a it's our baby, we've we've everyone in the community has benefited from it. We talked about you know, what were your highest characters before we jumped on. Tell the people real quick, your highest characters, but more importantly, tell them how you may have been able to kind of benefit or what are some lessons that you pulled away when you kind of went down that journey as well?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Absolutely. So I'm like a 96 or 98 D, I can't remember that exact number and I'm 34 C and then everything else is kind of falls down.

Nicky Saunders:

Pilot and an air traffic controller people, that's a pilot, and an air traffic controller, just wanted to put that out there. Anyways, go ahead, my bad.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yeah, and so what I'll say is this, um, I couldn't understand why people didn't think like me, like, you know, if I want something done, I'm gonna get it done. No BS allowed right? And I had a lot of people around me, that just, you know, they would just sit there and enjoy the smell of the BS and I'm like, yo, look, I don't like the smell, let's keep going. Right? And I couldn't figure it out. And so it would make me angry, it would make me fire people a whole lot faster than what I do now. Right? Like, if, like, I felt like, if you couldn't like get it, like right away and run with it, you had to go. And what I come to realize, with the DISC assessment is that I need those people because I'm wanting to go jump off a cliff. But if I have a high C, he's gonna make sure I have the parachute on me. And so I just want to make sure like, for me, whenever I do any business now, I make sure that the DISC assessment is involved. And I make sure that I understand everybody traits, even before we become business partners, we cannot do business if I don't know. Like, if I don't know your personality type, I can't do business with you, in a LLC, like, we won't create that together. Because it won't, it may not work, you know what I'm saying? But the DISC assessment, you know, helped me in my marriage, you know, like, I couldn't understand why my husband would see, every single detail would drive me crazy, you know, and now I appreciate those details and monetize that gift as well. Because you know, him as a contractor, he's able to go in and find every detail that can be off in a property, you know, and so it's a really great tool. I really appreciate it.

Nicky Saunders:

Shout out to the flight assessment. You can get the flight assessment and flightassessment.com where you can understand what character you are. I'm gonna bring back these random voices for these commercials. I promise you I am.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Yep! It's only right.

Nicky Saunders:

Okay, my last question. My last question. What is next for Terrica Lynn Smith? Like what for...Because Moose always talks about the business. You've been big on the real estate thing. But I'm going to be talking more for your personal brand because I think a lot of people really admired like the offline kind of vibe going into online because you like you say you're doing webinars, wait how many webinars you said you were doing like nine?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Eight of them coming up.

Nicky Saunders:

That's crazy. And we'll get into how to sign up for webinars and everything like that. But what is next for the brand of Terrica Lynn Smith?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yes. So I would say what's next for us is we're working on a documentary right now about my life story with some Grammy Award producers, which I'm super excited about that. And I believe that um, you know having

Nicky Saunders:

Why am I not apart of this? Hold on! Wait, my story... wait! How you not tell me about this project? Why am I a listener of my own podcast? Why am I... people we are listening... we're hearing this together. This is breaking news together. Anyways, we'll talk about that later.

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yeah, we're working on it. You know, and we're in the workings. Hopefully within the next, you know, 12 to 24 months we'll be able to launch the Terrica Lynn Smith story.

Nicky Saunders:

Hmm. Okay. All right.

Mostafa Ghonim:

Take notes.

Nicky Saunders:

You heard it first here on Nicky and Moose. Only here we all heard it together. We weren't privy to this prior to or nothing even though she has my phone number and texts me off of two numbers. But that's okay. That's alright. So real quick. Tell the people where they can find you. All that great stuff. What the webinars, the board game, all that great stuff where they can find you. And your social medias ya mean?

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yes, absolutely. So all my social media handles is Terrica Lynn Smith, type into Terrica Lynn Smith, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Tik Tok. You can type in Terrica Lynn Smith, and find me on that platform. And if you want to find out more about me, you can go to terricalynnsmith.com and find out more about me and everything that I'm involved in.

Nicky Saunders:

So real quick I have a laugh about the Tik Tok because she does some interesting Tik Toks. It is definitely showing more of her. Her side of life. It's really kind of funny. So definitely check her out on Tik Tok. First and foremost, follow us as well at Nicky and Moose everywhere. Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, shout out to everybody and shout out to all our YouTube viewers that are watching this. We appreciate y'all and if you are like Nicky, how did you get all this? Listen, this is done by E-Camm. Okay, you can get a 14 day trial. We keep telling you this every week. Shout out to those who signed up for the 14 day and are like Nicky, you and Moose are the only reason. We know and we appreciate you. Go to nickyandmoose.com/ecamm. E-C-A-M-M I had to even think about that. That was crazy. I had to think about it. But E-C-A-M-M go check that out. It's a whole vibe. Terrica, we love you. What we always do wha we always do is final word by Moose, but you are the gues . So what are a final words that you have for our lovel podcast or more breaking news r whatever you w

Terrica Lynn Smith:

Yes, yes, y s, I would say my favorite quo e, right? "The transfer of w alth is from the impatient to th patient." And so just be ause you don't have it right now don't become impatient. Just e patient and know that " he transfer of wealth is rom the impatient to the patie t."

Terrica Lynn Smith

At the young age of 5, I was sold by my mother to her drug dealer to pay a debt.

My innocence was used as currency.

This began a childhood riddled with abuse, neglect, poverty, and unstable foster homes that eventually led to me being a teen mom sleeping under a bridge in New Orleans. But under that same bridge where I had my lowest point, I also had my breakthrough. I made a promise to my son that I would do everything in my power to create a life that I had never seen before. Under that bridge I took my life back.

With the protection of God and a calling on my life, I stand before you 17 years later a published author, an Eric Thomas certified speaker, owner of the largest real estate crowdfunding company in the state of Louisiana, a seasoned investor with over 100 real estate holdings, and the founding investor in Madeline Cove, a 14 million dollar mixed use development in Lafayette, LA.

But the most valuable investment I have is my marriage. Though I had no healthy marriage to use as an example, I have been blissfully happy with my husband of 15 years where we have 4 beautiful children.

I STARTED IN LAST PLACE AND I WON.
Now I am teaching others to win AT ALL COSTS.